What do you guys feel when you give your resignation letter?

Light-hearted discussions, forum games and anything that doesn't fit into the other forums.

Moderators: Moderators, Celestial Heavens Staff

ywhtptgtfo
Hunter
Hunter
Posts: 528
Joined: 06 Jan 2006

What do you guys feel when you give your resignation letter?

Postby ywhtptgtfo » Feb 11 2015, 4:44

I just gave my 5 weeks notice today. Everyone around me gave congratulations and were more excited about my upcoming job than me. Ironically, I was going through the 5 phases of mourning since the moment I received the acceptance letter.

This seems like a common phenomenon for me whenever I change jobs. While I never regreted any of my job transitions in retrospect, I never really found the prospect of changing jobs to be something delightful.

I guess the talking point here is what type of emotions you guys go through when you switch.

User avatar
Neidhaart
Assassin
Assassin
Posts: 251
Joined: 13 Nov 2010
Location: Neidhaart

Postby Neidhaart » Feb 11 2015, 9:44

Sooo, what do you do?
"I did put the fires out."
"You made them worse!"
"Worse?!... Or better?"

User avatar
Panda Tar
Forum Mascot
Forum Mascot
Posts: 6562
Joined: 21 Feb 2006
Location: Florianópolis - Brasil

Postby Panda Tar » Feb 11 2015, 12:32

I didn't change jobs often.

The prospect of changing is quite amusing and delightful. I think it's a needed thing. Not really changing your job, but changing and transforming what you do. If you keep on the same thing forever, without reinventing or moving about, it's likely that you'll start feeling 'dead'.

The feel of changing is important for me, makes me quite happy. If people get happy for me in that matter too, all the better. :-D
"There’s nothing to fear but fear itself and maybe some mild to moderate jellification of bones." Cave Johnson, Portal 2. :panda:

User avatar
Angelspit
CH Founder
CH Founder
Posts: 6630
Joined: 18 Nov 2005
Location: Angelspit
Contact:

Postby Angelspit » Feb 11 2015, 14:34

I've been in the same job for nearly 20 years, although the job changed considerably over time, particularly after my previous company was acquired.

I came very close to change jobs a few times, and for some time I was considering switching to the video game industry. Sometimes it didn't work out in the end, and on one occasion I just decided that my current field (enterprise software) was better suited for me. But in all cases I was scared to death, fearing that a move would come with serious consequences. I wouldn't have been sure how to announce my decision to my boss, or how to say good bye to my colleagues. I'm sure it would have been all right in the end. Eventually I'll go somewhere else I guess.

But I just can't understand how some people manage to move from one job to another repeatedly.
I'm on Steam and Xbox Live.

User avatar
Kalah
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 20015
Joined: 24 Nov 2005

Postby Kalah » Feb 11 2015, 16:11

I don't like big changes in my life; even small changes of responsibilities within my current job is something that I need to take in and consider for a while before committing to them.

I did write a letter of resignation last year; in addition to my regular teaching job, I was spearheading a web-teaching project, essentially creating courses and teaching online. After a couple of years, this had grown into a full-time job with several hundred students. Over time, I realized that I just couldn't keep working two full-time jobs.

Of course, I took some comfort from the fact that the reason it had grown so big was that the course was very good. In fact, my boss' response to my resignation was that she was losing one of the best teachers they had - which was nice of her to say. :) In the end, though, the success of my work meant the job grew too big.
In War: Resolution, In Defeat: Defiance, In Victory: Magnanimity, In Peace: Goodwill.

ywhtptgtfo
Hunter
Hunter
Posts: 528
Joined: 06 Jan 2006

Postby ywhtptgtfo » Feb 12 2015, 2:00

Angelspit wrote:I've been in the same job for nearly 20 years, although the job changed considerably over time, particularly after my previous company was acquired.

I came very close to change jobs a few times, and for some time I was considering switching to the video game industry. Sometimes it didn't work out in the end, and on one occasion I just decided that my current field (enterprise software) was better suited for me. But in all cases I was scared to death, fearing that a move would come with serious consequences. I wouldn't have been sure how to announce my decision to my boss, or how to say good bye to my colleagues. I'm sure it would have been all right in the end. Eventually I'll go somewhere else I guess.

But I just can't understand how some people manage to move from one job to another repeatedly.


Most people around me are like Panda Tar. It's good to see there's at least one other person who just finds such changes so repulsive (despite the obvious practical advantages).

I also work in enterprise software and have been tempted to go for video game industry on various occasions. However, my move has always been half-hearted because I've never truly dived into C++ (which is required for basically all the cool game projects, unless one is into those boring mobile gaming).

My current move is to a more R&D role with data-mining. If my company has such roles with a proper team of data scientists, it would've been great. Unfortunately, they don't and so I had to look somewhere else.

Are you a dev, architech, or product manager?

Kalah wrote:I don't like big changes in my life; even small changes of responsibilities within my current job is something that I need to take in and consider for a while before committing to them.

I did write a letter of resignation last year; in addition to my regular teaching job, I was spearheading a web-teaching project, essentially creating courses and teaching online. After a couple of years, this had grown into a full-time job with several hundred students. Over time, I realized that I just couldn't keep working two full-time jobs.

Of course, I took some comfort from the fact that the reason it had grown so big was that the course was very good. In fact, my boss' response to my resignation was that she was losing one of the best teachers they had - which was nice of her to say. :) In the end, though, the success of my work meant the job grew too big.


You should host some free samples on CH.

User avatar
Kalah
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 20015
Joined: 24 Nov 2005

Postby Kalah » Feb 12 2015, 7:01

ywhtptgtfo wrote:You should host some free samples on CH.


No need - most of the resources are already out on iTunes, just search for podcasts by "Akademiet" and look at the ones for the course "Samfunnsfag" (social studies) and "Historie" (history). Then you'll find the lectures as videos (just a screen recording of my Powrepoints wihle I talk). These videos are also out on youtube, uploaded by the user "AkademietHistorie".
In War: Resolution, In Defeat: Defiance, In Victory: Magnanimity, In Peace: Goodwill.

User avatar
Neidhaart
Assassin
Assassin
Posts: 251
Joined: 13 Nov 2010
Location: Neidhaart

Postby Neidhaart » Feb 12 2015, 10:42

Well, atleast you've got fulltime jobs =)

I've passed 30, works part time-ish job in retail, spends my days trying to learn software development through webbased courses. I would welcome changes :)
"I did put the fires out."

"You made them worse!"

"Worse?!... Or better?"

User avatar
Angelspit
CH Founder
CH Founder
Posts: 6630
Joined: 18 Nov 2005
Location: Angelspit
Contact:

Postby Angelspit » Feb 12 2015, 15:16

ywhtptgtfo wrote:Are you a dev, architech, or product manager?

I work in localization at Oracle (previously at PeopleSoft), but I'm not a developer. My time is spent between QA, software testing, terminology, tool testing, vendor management and support, and some other things. I like the fact that there's a lot of variety.

Neidhaart wrote:I would welcome changes :)

You need to keep looking, try different things, keep in touch with people. One day you may feel like nothing is happening, and the next one you're aboard a new train and moving fast. Patience and hard work are they keys. :)
Last edited by Angelspit on Feb 12 2015, 19:26, edited 1 time in total.
I'm on Steam and Xbox Live.

User avatar
Pol
Admin
Admin
Posts: 9240
Joined: 29 Nov 2005
Location: IN SOMNIS VERITAS
Contact:

Postby Pol » Feb 12 2015, 18:50

Never needed one. But twice time I didn't prolonged a contract. Bad conditions, you know. ;)
"We made it!"
The Archives | Collection of H3&WoG files | Older albeit still useful | CH Downloads
PC Specs: A10-7850K, FM2A88X+K, 16GB-1600, SSD-MLC-G3, 1TB-HDD-G3, MAYA44, SP10 500W Be Quiet

User avatar
Panda Tar
Forum Mascot
Forum Mascot
Posts: 6562
Joined: 21 Feb 2006
Location: Florianópolis - Brasil

Postby Panda Tar » Feb 12 2015, 19:40

ywhtptgtfo wrote:Most people around me are like Panda Tar. It's good to see there's at least one other person who just finds such changes so repulsive (despite the obvious practical advantages).


I think that it mainly depends on what we have to consider before moving. As I'm still single and I don't own anything at all, I'm not bound to anywhere. Job can change, if it is for the better.

Now, I truly DREAD having to move away again, change the city I'm currently living. This is the only sort of change that I don't fancy at all.
"There’s nothing to fear but fear itself and maybe some mild to moderate jellification of bones." Cave Johnson, Portal 2. :panda:

ywhtptgtfo
Hunter
Hunter
Posts: 528
Joined: 06 Jan 2006

Postby ywhtptgtfo » Feb 13 2015, 6:37

Neidhaart wrote:Well, atleast you've got fulltime jobs =)

I've passed 30, works part time-ish job in retail, spends my days trying to learn software development through webbased courses. I would welcome changes :)


Doing web-based course is better than doing nothing, but you need real project experience to have a decent chance at a job. If you don't have a CS degree, it's also gonna hurt you real bad in the resume filtering process by HR.

If you haven't started already, build yourself a website and load it up with code samples and finished projects. That's the best way to stand out prior to interviews.

In addition, you may want to read job requirements to gauge what you need to focus on. If you want to do gaming, C++ is almost a must followed by OpenGL/DirectX.

If you want to be in web, then PHP, JS, HTML, CSS, and ASP.NET.

For enterprise desktop application, then Java/C# and SQL.

Most jobs will list most of what I listed above as requirements or good to haves.

Angelspit wrote:
ywhtptgtfo wrote:Are you a dev, architech, or product manager?

I work in localization at Oracle (previously at PeopleSoft), but I'm not a developer. My time is spent between QA, software testing, terminology, tool testing, vendor management and support, and some other things. I like the fact that there's a lot of variety.


That's a similar level of versatility as what I have. In addition to front/back-end coding, I do build releases, internal operations, documentation, workspace setup, and communications with support/IT/Cloud. I only spend about 30% of time each day coding.

Kalah wrote:
ywhtptgtfo wrote:You should host some free samples on CH.


No need - most of the resources are already out on iTunes, just search for podcasts by "Akademiet" and look at the ones for the course "Samfunnsfag" (social studies) and "Historie" (history). Then you'll find the lectures as videos (just a screen recording of my Powrepoints wihle I talk). These videos are also out on youtube, uploaded by the user "AkademietHistorie".


Ah so you teach high school. Unfortunately, I don't understand a thing in the website. It's all børk! børk! børk to me. :/ So Scandinavian high schools have web podcasts? That's pretty advanced to what we have in North America and East Asia.

User avatar
Neidhaart
Assassin
Assassin
Posts: 251
Joined: 13 Nov 2010
Location: Neidhaart

Postby Neidhaart » Feb 13 2015, 9:35

ywhtptgtfo wrote:
Neidhaart wrote:Well, atleast you've got fulltime jobs =)

I've passed 30, works part time-ish job in retail, spends my days trying to learn software development through webbased courses. I would welcome changes :)


Doing web-based course is better than doing nothing, but you need real project experience to have a decent chance at a job. If you don't have a CS degree, it's also gonna hurt you real bad in the resume filtering process by HR.

If you haven't started already, build yourself a website and load it up with code samples and finished projects. That's the best way to stand out prior to interviews.

In addition, you may want to read job requirements to gauge what you need to focus on. If you want to do gaming, C++ is almost a must followed by OpenGL/DirectX.

If you want to be in web, then PHP, JS, HTML, CSS, and ASP.NET.

For enterprise desktop application, then Java/C# and SQL.

Most jobs will list most of what I listed above as requirements or good to haves.


Good thing im doing C# also then. I kinda been doing lots of CS-related courses so maybe i can even put together a degree. Well. Maybe. Better get them projects started i guess.
"I did put the fires out."

"You made them worse!"

"Worse?!... Or better?"

User avatar
Kalah
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 20015
Joined: 24 Nov 2005

Postby Kalah » Feb 13 2015, 14:13

ywhtptgtfo wrote:Ah so you teach high school. Unfortunately, I don't understand a thing in the website. It's all børk! børk! børk to me. :/ So Scandinavian high schools have web podcasts? That's pretty advanced to what we have in North America and East Asia.


Heheh "børk, børk" ... :D
I work for a private school and we're quite advanced. In addition to the normal school, I also worked for the school's web-based learning program, which (obviously) relied on podcasts and such for the lectures.

Ehm ... North America and East Asia? Where do you live?! :devious:
In War: Resolution, In Defeat: Defiance, In Victory: Magnanimity, In Peace: Goodwill.

ywhtptgtfo
Hunter
Hunter
Posts: 528
Joined: 06 Jan 2006

Postby ywhtptgtfo » Feb 14 2015, 1:14

Neidhaart wrote:Good thing im doing C# also then. I kinda been doing lots of CS-related courses so maybe i can even put together a degree. Well. Maybe. Better get them projects started i guess.


What skills do you have in CS other than C#?

To give you a feel of the industry, this is a very standard type of job requirements for entry level software jobs in Canada.

What's not always listed but equally important are the soft skills. Experience in version control is quite essential these days and a firm grasp of design patterns, complexity analysis, OOP, and data structures are usually required to pass.

Companies like IBM, Amazon, and especially Microsoft are known to quiz people to death on these things.

And if you don't have a CS degree, you are at a severe disadvantage so please get one even if it is from an online university (which will still be discriminated against by HR departments).

An alternative way to break into the industry is to start as a QA or graphics designer. I have friends who pulled stunts like this.

Kalah wrote:
ywhtptgtfo wrote:Ah so you teach high school. Unfortunately, I don't understand a thing in the website. It's all børk! børk! børk to me. :/ So Scandinavian high schools have web podcasts? That's pretty advanced to what we have in North America and East Asia.


Heheh "børk, børk" ... :D
I work for a private school and we're quite advanced. In addition to the normal school, I also worked for the school's web-based learning program, which (obviously) relied on podcasts and such for the lectures.

Ehm ... North America and East Asia? Where do you live?! :devious:


Kalah the Teacher. That's unexpected. We should hire you for that 10% to EXP gain.

Speaking of Scandinavian languages. Is it true that Danes talk like they have a mouthful of potatoes?

I am an East Asian living in Canada.

User avatar
Kalah
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 20015
Joined: 24 Nov 2005

Postby Kalah » Feb 14 2015, 13:00

ywhtptgtfo wrote:Speaking of Scandinavian languages. Is it true that Danes talk like they have a mouthful of potatoes?


Yeh, just like the Dutch speak like they're trying to caugh them up. ;)

ywhtptgtfo wrote:I am an East Asian living in Canada.


Aha, that makes sense. :)
In War: Resolution, In Defeat: Defiance, In Victory: Magnanimity, In Peace: Goodwill.

User avatar
wimfrits
Round Table Knight
Round Table Knight
Posts: 2030
Joined: 06 Jan 2006
Location: Utrecht, the Netherlands

Postby wimfrits » Feb 16 2015, 17:58

Kalah wrote:børk! børk! børk! Dutch potatoes!


I agree Kalah. Dutch potatoes are the best! ;)
Are you suggesting coconuts migrate?

ywhtptgtfo
Hunter
Hunter
Posts: 528
Joined: 06 Jan 2006

Postby ywhtptgtfo » Feb 20 2015, 0:47

wimfrits wrote:
Kalah wrote:børk! børk! børk! Dutch potatoes!


I agree Kalah. Dutch potatoes are the best! ;)


I thought the Dutch only grow oranges.

User avatar
wimfrits
Round Table Knight
Round Table Knight
Posts: 2030
Joined: 06 Jan 2006
Location: Utrecht, the Netherlands

Postby wimfrits » Feb 20 2015, 7:37

ywhtptgtfo wrote:I thought the Dutch only grow oranges.


That's a common misunderstanding. Dutch people grow orange. From time to time that is :)
Are you suggesting coconuts migrate?

User avatar
HodgePodge
Round Table Knight
Round Table Knight
Posts: 3525
Joined: 06 Jan 2006

Postby HodgePodge » Feb 26 2015, 20:37

Even though I love potatoes and I'm having them for dinner tonight, :yummy: I wanted to get back on topic about resignation letters/notices:

Really depends on the job, your co-workers and your boss(es). If the job is terrible and your co-workers and bosses are bullies, then by all means, submitting your resignation is a call for celebration. :oex:

On the other hand: wait, is there any other hand? :rip:

Okay, I digress, if you love your job and are friends with your co-worker(s) and your boss pays you a fair wage (with benefits) for your blood, sweat, tears and time, then it is sad to leave.

I've only had one job like this though. I was happy to be rid of all the others. :tonguehands:
Walk Softly & Respect All Life!

Click Here: Lords of War and Money … A Free & Fun Browser Game.


Return to “Campfire”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests